Gifts from the Cinema

On more than one occasion, it has occurred to me that movies are, in many ways, the visual equivalent of music.  When done well, the result is an emotional connection with the recipient of the message.  Repeated viewing, like repeated listening, provides opportunity to deepen the connection and hence, the appreciation.

The two art forms often work together, each enhancing what the other brings to the audience, without diminishing the ability of either to stand on its own.  Music can profoundly affect how a movie (or a scene within it) is perceived.  Movies can also provide another means of finding great music we might not hear otherwise.

Some great movies I’ve enjoyed over the years have in turn led me to some great music.  I am confident the impact of films like Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho”, “North by Northwest”, and “Vertigo”, Orson Wells’ “Citizen Kane”, J. Lee Thompson’s “Cape Fear”, François Truffaut’s “Fahrenheit 451”, or Martin Scorsese’s “Taxi Driver” would have been radically different without the music of Bernard Hermann.

Similarly, Nino Rota’s music played a significant role in the movies of Federico Fellini as well as in Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather trilogy.  Perry Henzell’s “The Harder They Come” is known for the reggae music that comprises its soundtrack.  Carol Reed’s noir classic “The Third Man” is highlighted by the distinctive sound of a zither, played by Anton Karas, who composed the score.

Recently, I saw an extraordinarily beautiful film from Italy that was released in 2013: Paolo Sorrentino’s “The Great Beauty” (aka “La Grande Bellezza”).  Aside from the story, the characters, the acting, the cinematography, and the visuals of this movie, I found the soundtrack captivating, with a variety of musical cues from different sources, in different genres.  I purchased the soundtrack disc(s) as well as the DVD and have found it as difficult to stop listening as it has been to stop viewing this new favorite.

This movie is loaded with musical gems, from the opening a cappella “I Lie”, performed by the Torino Vocalensemble, to Danish soprano Else Torp’s performance of Arvo Pärt’s “My Heart’s in the Highlands” (with lyrics from the Robert Burns poem of the same name), to the Kronos Quartet’s rendition of Vladimir Martynov’s “The Beatitudes”.  In addition, the soundtrack features some more pop oriented music including a sensitive performance by Damien Jurado performing his “Everything Trying” and even some club-oriented dance music.  You’d have to see the movie to understand how it all works together.  Musically as well as cinematically, there is much to treasure.

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